arguing lawyers.jpg[Blogger’s note:  Whether by dint of nature or nurture, lawyers love to argue; immigration lawyers perhaps more so. Unlike our colleagues (outside of immigration practice) for whom sources of law are better defined, immigration attorneys can access a wider array of law and non-law sources with which to fashion our pro and con arguments.  

pensive youth.pngI worry a lot about the future facing America’s young adults.  Saddled with Dickensian levels of college and grad-school debt, largely unable to find opportunities in their preferred careers, our young fear that they’ll be relegated to work in low-paid, dead-end jobs. They and their parents are rightly concerned that the middle class is disappearing,

Private Dino Paparelli.jpgSurprising as it may be to Italian-American youth of today, with a Cuomo as governor of New York and a Scalia and an Alito as Supreme Court justices, this kid of 1950s’ Detroit hated his Italian name and resented his father for having conferred it.  “Angelo Alfredo Paparelli” was too much ethnicity to bear. 

I’m not

[Blogger’s note: This article is reprinted with permission from the February 22, 2012 edition of The New York Law Journal.  ©2010 ALM Properties Inc. All rights reserved. Further duplication without permission is prohibited. The authors thank the Journal for permission to reprint this article.]  

Waiting.jpg

No More Waiting on Legal Immigration

By Angelo

President Obama had a macho moment this week when he suggested, rhetorically, a poll of ghosts. “Ask Osama Bin Laden” and the “22 out of 30 top al-Qaeda leaders who’ve been taken off the field,” he proposed, “whether I engage in appeasement.”  The storied bugaboo of foreign-policy appeasement, best typified by the flaccidity of British Prime

Magnet.jpgThe recent CNN GOP debate on foreign policy surprised many for what it included and excluded.  Amazingly, nothing was said of the European debt crisis that threatens to create severe financial blowback in America.  The surprise by inclusion came from Republican flavor of the month, Newt Gingrich, who responded to a domestic policy question on immigration

Bangalore immigration.jpgAt least when it comes to India, Yogi Berra had it wrong. It’s not déjà vu all over again. 

Blogging this weekend from my hotel room in Mumbai, I vividly recall my first trip to India in 1993. Invited as part of an American Bar Association delegation, I spoke in New Delhi on “Nonimmigrant Visa Options for Computer

skull.jpgMany dysfunctions within the immigration ecospace are disturbing, but some make my blood boil.  The conniption that brought me to this Howard Beale moment erupted after I belatedly read a Forbes online article, published last April, by Osha Gray Davis (A Death in Juarez: How U.S. Immigration Policy Is Tearing American Families Apart“). The Forbes piece reported on two

global workersWith the President’s supporters pleading for action, Barack Obama at last has pivoted to jobs.  “Pass this bill [the American Jobs Act]” has become his oft-shouted mantra. Surprisingly, however, career bureaucrats within the Departments of State and Homeland Security apparently haven’t read his September 8 speech to Congress and instead are taking affirmative steps to prevent

Today, the 10th anniversary of the terrorist savagery of September 11, 2001, the nation pauses to remember the fallen and reflect on how our country has changed in the decade past.  PBS and The New Yorker offer worthy contemplations on the changes since 9/11 and today, and two immigration lawyers, Cyrus Mehta and Jonathan Montag